Viewing Posts tagged: planets

These are pictures of slides of various tissue in the body. I liked how the slides look like planets in a way.

Posted Sunday Nov 18 4pm  13 notes

 
 

(Source: starstuffblog, via shychemist)

View HD • Posted Saturday Jun 2 9pm  282 notes

 
 

Watch

rhamphotheca:

The Last Transit of Venus in Your Lifetime

(Tuesday, June 5th, 2012)

The transit will begin at around 6:09 p.m. EDT (22:09 GMT) on Tuesday, June 5, and will last roughly seven hours. People located in the mid-Pacific region, where the sun will be high overhead throughout the transit, are particularly lucky because they will be able to witness majority of the event.

Still, others in North America, Europe, Asia and eastern Africa should be able to see at least part of the transit in person.

In North America, the best time to view the transit will be in the afternoon, in the hours before sunset on June 5. In Europe, Africa and Australia, Venus will be traveling across the sun as it rises in the morning on June 6…

(find out more: Space.com)

Posted Saturday Jun 2 3pm  24 notes with

 
 

the-star-stuff:

There’s more water on Jupiter’s moon Europa than there is on Earth
Based on data acquired by NASA’s Galileo satellite, astronomers think the global oceans sloshing around beneath Europa’s icy exterior are likely 2—3 more voluminous than the oceans here on Earth. Not 2—3 times more proportionally, 2—3 times more in total volume.
Illustration by Kevin Hand (JPL/Caltech), Jack Cook (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution), Howard Perlman (USGS); Spotted on NASA APOD

the-star-stuff:

There’s more water on Jupiter’s moon Europa than there is on Earth

Based on data acquired by NASA’s Galileo satellite, astronomers think the global oceans sloshing around beneath Europa’s icy exterior are likely 2—3 more voluminous than the oceans here on Earth. Not 2—3 times more proportionally, 2—3 times more in total volume.

Illustration by Kevin Hand (JPL/Caltech), Jack Cook (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution), Howard Perlman (USGS); Spotted on NASA APOD

(via polymath4ever)

View HD • Posted Friday May 25 9pm  814 notes

 
 

A Planetary System from the Early Universe
ScienceDaily (Mar. 27, 2012) — A group of European astronomers has discovered an ancient planetary system that is likely to be a survivor from one of the earliest cosmic eras, 13 billion years ago. The system consists of the star HIP 11952 and two planets, which have orbital periods of 290 and 7 days, respectively. Whereas planets usually form within clouds that include heavier chemical elements, the star HIP 11952 contains very little other than hydrogen and helium. The system promises to shed light on planet formation in the early universe — under conditions quite different from those of later planetary systems, such as our own.

A Planetary System from the Early Universe

ScienceDaily (Mar. 27, 2012) — A group of European astronomers has discovered an ancient planetary system that is likely to be a survivor from one of the earliest cosmic eras, 13 billion years ago. The system consists of the star HIP 11952 and two planets, which have orbital periods of 290 and 7 days, respectively. Whereas planets usually form within clouds that include heavier chemical elements, the star HIP 11952 contains very little other than hydrogen and helium. The system promises to shed light on planet formation in the early universe — under conditions quite different from those of later planetary systems, such as our own.

View HD • Posted Tuesday Mar 27 6pm  2 notes

 
 

Some Orbits More Popular Than Others in Solar Systems
ScienceDaily (Mar. 19, 2012) — Computer simulations have revealed a plausible explanation for a phenomenon that has puzzled astronomers: Rather than occupying orbits at regular distances from a star, giant gas planets similar to Jupiter and Saturn appear to prefer to occupy certain regions in mature solar systems while staying clear of others.

Some Orbits More Popular Than Others in Solar Systems

ScienceDaily (Mar. 19, 2012) — Computer simulations have revealed a plausible explanation for a phenomenon that has puzzled astronomers: Rather than occupying orbits at regular distances from a star, giant gas planets similar to Jupiter and Saturn appear to prefer to occupy certain regions in mature solar systems while staying clear of others.

• Posted Tuesday Mar 20 1am  1 note

 
 

nationalpost:

Venus’ day — the equivalent of 243 on Earth — gets longer. Is friction putting the brakes on the planet’s rotation?Contrary to its alluring name, Venus is the planet from hell, with an atmosphere so hot, toxic and heavy that any visitor would risk being simultaneously melted, suffocated and crushed.
But not just that: the second planet from the Sun turns on its axis  so slowly that, for any survivor, a Venusian day would seem  interminable, for it is the equivalent of 243 days on Earth.
To make things worse, a day on Venus is getting even longer, French astronomers have discovered. (Photo: HO/AFP/Getty Image)

nationalpost:

Venus’ day — the equivalent of 243 on Earth — gets longer. Is friction putting the brakes on the planet’s rotation?
Contrary to its alluring name, Venus is the planet from hell, with an atmosphere so hot, toxic and heavy that any visitor would risk being simultaneously melted, suffocated and crushed.

But not just that: the second planet from the Sun turns on its axis so slowly that, for any survivor, a Venusian day would seem interminable, for it is the equivalent of 243 days on Earth.

To make things worse, a day on Venus is getting even longer, French astronomers have discovered. (Photo: HO/AFP/Getty Image)

(via shychemist)

View HD • Posted Wednesday Feb 29 2pm  478 notes

 
 

fire-in-the-night:

A set of recent papers, many of which draw on data from NASA’s  Cassini spacecraft, reveal new details in the emerging picture of how  Saturn’s moon Titan shifts with the seasons and even throughout the day.  The papers, published in the journal Planetary and Space Science in a  special issue titled “Titan through Time”, show how this largest moon of  Saturn is a cousin - though a very peculiar cousin - of Earth

fire-in-the-night:

A set of recent papers, many of which draw on data from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft, reveal new details in the emerging picture of how Saturn’s moon Titan shifts with the seasons and even throughout the day. The papers, published in the journal Planetary and Space Science in a special issue titled “Titan through Time”, show how this largest moon of Saturn is a cousin - though a very peculiar cousin - of Earth

(Source: rebelphilosophy, via thescienceofreality)

• Posted Friday Feb 24 1am  11 notes

 
 

Chemical Clues On Formation of Planetary Systems: Earth ‘Siblings’ Can Be Different
ScienceDaily (Feb. 23, 2012) — An international team of researchers, with the participation of IAC astronomers, has discovered that the chemical structure of Earth-like planets can be very different from the bulk composition of Earth. This may have a dramatic effect on the existence and formation of the biospheres and life on Earth-like planets.

Chemical Clues On Formation of Planetary Systems: Earth ‘Siblings’ Can Be Different

ScienceDaily (Feb. 23, 2012) — An international team of researchers, with the participation of IAC astronomers, has discovered that the chemical structure of Earth-like planets can be very different from the bulk composition of Earth. This may have a dramatic effect on the existence and formation of the biospheres and life on Earth-like planets.

• Posted Friday Feb 24 1am  1 note

 
 

unknownskywalker:

Kepler announces 11 planetary systems hosting 26 planets

The planets orbit close to their host stars and range in size from 1.5 times the radius of Earth to larger than Jupiter. Fifteen of them are between Earth and Neptune in size, and further observations will be required to determine which are rocky like Earth and which have thick gaseous atmospheres like Neptune. The planets orbit their host star once every six to 143 days. All are closer to their host star than Venus is to our sun.
Each of the new confirmed planetary systems contains two to five closely spaced transiting planets. The system with the most planets among these discoveries is Kepler-33, a star that is older and more massive than our sun. Kepler-33 hosts five planets, ranging in size from 1.5 to 5 times that of Earth and all located closer to their star than any planet is to the sun.
Prior to the Kepler mission, we knew of perhaps 500 exoplanets across the whole sky. Now, in just two years staring at a patch of sky not much bigger than your fist, Kepler has discovered more than 60 planets and more than 2,300 planet candidates. This tells us that our galaxy is positively loaded with planets of all sizes and orbits.
Above: Out of hundreds of candidate planetary systems, scientists had previously verified six systems with multiple transiting planets (denoted here in red). Now, Kepler observations have verified planets in 11 new planetary systems (shown here in green). Many of these systems contain additional planet candidates that are yet to be verified (shown here in dark purple). For reference, the eight planets of the solar system are shown in blue. View full-size image (7292×2668 px) →

unknownskywalker:

Kepler announces 11 planetary systems hosting 26 planets

The planets orbit close to their host stars and range in size from 1.5 times the radius of Earth to larger than Jupiter. Fifteen of them are between Earth and Neptune in size, and further observations will be required to determine which are rocky like Earth and which have thick gaseous atmospheres like Neptune. The planets orbit their host star once every six to 143 days. All are closer to their host star than Venus is to our sun.

Each of the new confirmed planetary systems contains two to five closely spaced transiting planets. The system with the most planets among these discoveries is Kepler-33, a star that is older and more massive than our sun. Kepler-33 hosts five planets, ranging in size from 1.5 to 5 times that of Earth and all located closer to their star than any planet is to the sun.

Prior to the Kepler mission, we knew of perhaps 500 exoplanets across the whole sky. Now, in just two years staring at a patch of sky not much bigger than your fist, Kepler has discovered more than 60 planets and more than 2,300 planet candidates. This tells us that our galaxy is positively loaded with planets of all sizes and orbits.

Above: Out of hundreds of candidate planetary systems, scientists had previously verified six systems with multiple transiting planets (denoted here in red). Now, Kepler observations have verified planets in 11 new planetary systems (shown here in green). Many of these systems contain additional planet candidates that are yet to be verified (shown here in dark purple). For reference, the eight planets of the solar system are shown in blue. View full-size image (7292×2668 px) →

View HD • Posted Thursday Jan 26 4pm  442 notes

 
 
 
 
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