Viewing Posts tagged: physics

'Impossible’ Binary Stars Discovered
ScienceDaily (July 5, 2012) — A team of astronomers have used the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) on Hawaii to discover four pairs of stars that orbit each other in less than 4 hours. Until now it was thought that such close-in binary stars could not exist. The new discoveries come from the telescope’s Wide Field Camera (WFCAM) Transit Survey, and appear in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

'Impossible’ Binary Stars Discovered


ScienceDaily (July 5, 2012) — A team of astronomers have used the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) on Hawaii to discover four pairs of stars that orbit each other in less than 4 hours. Until now it was thought that such close-in binary stars could not exist. The new discoveries come from the telescope’s Wide Field Camera (WFCAM) Transit Survey, and appear in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

View HD • Posted Thursday Jul 5 9pm  124 notes

 
 

Tabletop X-Ray to Image Nanoworld: All the Colors of a High-Energy Rainbow, in a Tightly Focused Beam

ScienceDaily (June 7, 2012) — For the first time, researchers have produced a coherent, laser-like, directed beam of light that simultaneously streams ultraviolet light, X-rays, and all wavelengths in between.

Tabletop X-Ray to Image Nanoworld: All the Colors of a High-Energy Rainbow, in a Tightly Focused Beam

ScienceDaily (June 7, 2012) — For the first time, researchers have produced a coherent, laser-like, directed beam of light that simultaneously streams ultraviolet light, X-rays, and all wavelengths in between.

• Posted Sunday Jun 10 8pm  6 notes

 
 

New Property of Flames Sparks Advances in Technology
ScienceDaily (June 7, 2012) — Chemists at UCL have discovered a new property of flames, which allows them to control reactions at a solid surface in a flame and opens up a whole new field of chemical innovation.

New Property of Flames Sparks Advances in Technology


ScienceDaily (June 7, 2012) — Chemists at UCL have discovered a new property of flames, which allows them to control reactions at a solid surface in a flame and opens up a whole new field of chemical innovation.

• Posted Sunday Jun 10 8pm  

 
 

Quantum Computers Will Be Able to Simulate Particle Collisions

ScienceDaily (June 1, 2012) — Quantum computers are still years away, but a trio of theorists has already figured out at least one talent they may have. According to the theorists, including one from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), physicists might one day use quantum computers to study the inner workings of the universe in ways that are far beyond the reach of even the most powerful conventional supercomputers.

Quantum Computers Will Be Able to Simulate Particle Collisions

ScienceDaily (June 1, 2012) — Quantum computers are still years away, but a trio of theorists has already figured out at least one talent they may have. According to the theorists, including one from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), physicists might one day use quantum computers to study the inner workings of the universe in ways that are far beyond the reach of even the most powerful conventional supercomputers.

• Posted Sunday Jun 3 9pm  31 notes

 
 

X-Ray ‘Echoes’ Map a Supermassive Black Hole’s Environs in Distant Galaxies
ScienceDaily (May 31, 2012) — An international team of astronomers using data from the European Space Agency’s (ESA) XMM-Newton satellite has identified a long-sought X-ray “echo” that promises a new way to probe supersized black holes in distant galaxies.

X-Ray ‘Echoes’ Map a Supermassive Black Hole’s Environs in Distant Galaxies

ScienceDaily (May 31, 2012) — An international team of astronomers using data from the European Space Agency’s (ESA) XMM-Newton satellite has identified a long-sought X-ray “echo” that promises a new way to probe supersized black holes in distant galaxies.


• Posted Sunday Jun 3 9pm  25 notes

 
 

6 Scientific Discoveries That Laugh in the Face of Physics
As we’ve pointed out before, there are some startlingly simple questions that science can’t answer. And then there are the special occasions where the universe up and does a freaking magic trick that seems to be designed by an unjust, all-powerful entity dedicated to making scientists slowly pull off their glasses while saying, “What in the hell?” For instance …

6 Scientific Discoveries That Laugh in the Face of Physics


As we’ve pointed out before, there are some startlingly simple questions that science can’t answer. And then there are the special occasions where the universe up and does a freaking magic trick that seems to be designed by an unjust, all-powerful entity dedicated to making scientists slowly pull off their glasses while saying, “What in the hell?” For instance …


View HD • Posted Sunday Jun 3 5pm  5 notes

 
 

adhrpr:

scinerds:

Making Waves
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute Friday, May 25, 2012
 Two of Saturn’s moons affect the planet’s rings visibly. Daphnis, at lower left, orbits in the Keeler Gap of the A right, creating waves in the edge of the gap. Pan, in the top right, orbits in the Encke Gap of the A ring, creating wakes that are seen in the ring below Pan in the image.The image was taken in visible light by Cassini spacecraft on June 3, 2010.— Tom Chao

Around a gas giant, no less. Reality continues to bend my mind.

adhrpr:

scinerds:

Making Waves

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute Friday, May 25, 2012

 Two of Saturn’s moons affect the planet’s rings visibly. Daphnis, at lower left, orbits in the Keeler Gap of the A right, creating waves in the edge of the gap. Pan, in the top right, orbits in the Encke Gap of the A ring, creating wakes that are seen in the ring below Pan in the image.The image was taken in visible light by Cassini spacecraft on June 3, 2010.

— Tom Chao

Around a gas giant, no less. Reality continues to bend my mind.

(via thescienceofreality)

View HD • Posted Saturday Jun 2 9pm  50 notes

 
 

scinerds:

Two More Elements Added to The Periodic Table
You can now greet by name two new residents of the period table of elements: Flerovium and Livermorium.
The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry officially approved names for the elements — which sit at slot 114 and 116, respectively — on 31 May. They have until now gone by the temporary monikers ununquadium and ununhexium.

scinerds:

Two More Elements Added to The Periodic Table

You can now greet by name two new residents of the period table of elements: Flerovium and Livermorium.

The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry officially approved names for the elements — which sit at slot 114 and 116, respectively — on 31 May. They have until now gone by the temporary monikers ununquadium and ununhexium.

(via thescienceofreality)

View HD • Posted Saturday Jun 2 12am  3,184 notes

 
 

rhamphotheca:

On August 1, 2010, almost the entire Earth-facing side of the sun erupted in a tumult of activity. This image of the solar event shows the C3-class solar flare (white area on upper left), a solar tsunami (wave-like structure, upper right), multiple filaments of magnetism lifting off the stellar surface, large-scale shaking of the solar corona, radio bursts, a coronal mass ejection and more. Different colors in the image represent different gas temperatures.
(via: Wikipedia)      (image: NASA/SDO/AIA)

rhamphotheca:

On August 1, 2010, almost the entire Earth-facing side of the sun erupted in a tumult of activity. This image of the solar event shows the C3-class solar flare (white area on upper left), a solar tsunami (wave-like structure, upper right), multiple filaments of magnetism lifting off the stellar surface, large-scale shaking of the solar corona, radio bursts, a coronal mass ejection and more. Different colors in the image represent different gas temperatures.

(via: Wikipedia)      (image: NASA/SDO/AIA)

View HD • Posted Monday May 28 2am  83 notes

 
 

Nanoparticles Seen as Artificial Atoms
ScienceDaily (May 24, 2012) — In the growth of crystals, do nanoparticles act as “artificial atoms” forming molecular-type building blocks that can assemble into complex structures? This is the contention of a major but controversial theory to explain nanocrystal growth. A study by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) may resolve the controversy and point the way to energy devices of the future.

Nanoparticles Seen as Artificial Atoms

ScienceDaily (May 24, 2012) — In the growth of crystals, do nanoparticles act as “artificial atoms” forming molecular-type building blocks that can assemble into complex structures? This is the contention of a major but controversial theory to explain nanocrystal growth. A study by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) may resolve the controversy and point the way to energy devices of the future.

• Posted Friday May 25 11pm  

 
 
 
 
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